Tag Archives: alisa craig

Tomato time! #gdnbloggers

“Get them home before the blight comes.”

So said the Allotment Secretary as I trundled home with trug number of two of tomatoes. It started with trug number one and a couple of carrier bags.

We have had quite a few varieties on the plot. These are-if I remember correctly-tigerella, latah, moneymaker, yellow stuffer, cream sausage alisa craig and marmande. I may have missed out a few.

Anyway, I’ve been complaining acutely over the course of the growing season as to how little produce I have managed to sow and grow. I may have over looked the productivity of the thirty two-ish plants that were grown across the two family plots.

I remember having that many plants, and dividing them between my plot and mum’s. I had a feeling, that there would be quite a few if all things went well. Now, having seen a few of plants on neighbouring plots start to with and go all very baroque gothic with would be blight, I have harvested a fair amount.

For fair amount, read poundage and one big massive puddle. I have maybe one trug full left, which I might harvest next week if the airborne blight is still away in distance.

Some of the fruit are actually turning; there are splodges of red, yellow and orange floating around. I have to say, that it is the latah one’s that are by far the reddest of them all. Even moneymaker is somewhat orange hued and not red.

As you can see, there is an assortment of different shapes and sizes. Once you have sown and grown your own tomatoes, you cannot look at the generic shop bought ones in the same light. There is also the question of flavour-the distinct tomato-y-ness. The fibre of the fruit, is is squishy, solid or just a flesh that is held up up by sugars.  This lunchtime, as I sliced up a yellow stuffer for a side salad, I realised why it was a stuffer and not a salad tomato. It had been looking at me for days, pleading to be used. Although moneymaker is uniformly round, there are other varieties that are less pretty. And thank goodness that they are! There are quite a few knobbly marmande fruit, with their rather weird and wonderful shape. It is a shame, that in most instances, not many people will eat what is lovingly termed ‘ugly fruit’. It tastes the same, is of the same edible quality, and proves that nature loves wonkiness. There are far more wonky things, compared to the bland, uniform, tick all the boxes, don’t make a fuss variety.

That puddles is huge, and would probably make a lovely green tomato chutney. I’m not particularly feeling the chutney at the moment. I have some hope, that within the confines of a warm environment, these fruit will turn. In which case, they can be used in Mama F’s kitchen and I might even consider investigating pasta sauce  of some kind. There is also the option of ready made tarka mix as well, that could be interesting.

So the growing season hasn’t been an entire bust; the tomatoes are okay. I’m sure I have spuds to lift as well……

 

For now, it’s all okay, and smelling of tomatoes. (Trust me, that is not attractive….)

Tomato time and out.

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Today was the day that the tomatoes were turfed out of their transparent box in the poly tunnel. They have been sat there for a while making the transition. To be honest, think it was bit too hot for them, a few of the leaves have been scorched no matter how much I watered them. At forty degrees in the poly tunnel, I can understand wanting to get out.They were also getting tall, not gangly, but ready to make an exit. 

 

So today there were meant to be fifteen plants, planted out. I managed fourteen, as one of them is actually quite tiny. Looks a bit developmentally delayed, compared to the rest of it’s peer group. Last year, all of the tomatoes were in raised beds. This year, with the extra space, with the exception of four, out in open group. Dotted in the corners of large beds, in project othello, largely. Quite an assortment really varieties, we have black cherry, alisa craig however you want to spell it, money maker, gardeners delight and yellow stuffer. I did look at the number that I planted out today, and surveying the space; felt a pang to sow some more. We shall see, I know that they grow reasonably quick anyway. Have bulb planted them in and watered. 

You say to-may-to, I say tomato #2

Bit of a tomato humdinging special for you all today. Thought it might be useful to take some photographic evidence. I like taking photographic evidence, and it makes you all pay some welcome, loving  attention.

I have never grown so many tomatoes, or had this level of success with triffid like vines and bush habits. These are, with the exception of the Ukrainian Purple; the tiddler tomatos who had tantrums from the classroom. The weather has helped, and we have a sprawling mass of foliage and fruit. A feat of engineering is required to truss up….the trusses.

It would be nice to actually get some ripened, red and yellow fruits. So to facilitate that, I have been trimming off the excess foliage. This should help the air pass through, and stop the leaves getting sweaty and horrible; as well as prevent any of the fruits being shaded. There are some large fruits, and also some diddly ones. A testament, to the different varieties that were sown. It is very hard to believe, that these are the tiny tiddlers that were started off in the classroom. They aren’t particularly pretty, either! You would never associate the fruits cropping here, with the smooth, shiny fruits that you would find in the supermarket. I think there are some yellow and black ones in there. Again, you wouldn’t see these very often in the supermarket. Will be intrigued to see the yellow ones and the black ones. The black ones are cherry tomatoes, I think.

 

Some silent movies for you, to peruse at your leisure. I do hope that they are not like watching paint dry. You might have to spot the tomato, and look very carefully.

A bit wonky, yes. How many of you tilted your head to the left to watch it? 😉

The colour is a bit off. The green is starting to change, actually. Going from green to yellow.

The plum shaped ones-the wonky ones-are ukranian purple. That was an adopted one. There is a non-wonky ones in there too.

I couldn’t tell you, what is which variety. One day I will label. I did actually find that one of the beasts is still in a paper pot. This has in turn rooted out of the paper pot and into the dirt of the raised beds. Had to dig it in a bit without pulling it out. 

 

Shall see what happens

 

Yours in anticipation,

 

Horticultural Hobbit